Da Vinci Code book related reviews


Product: Book Hardcover
Title: The Da Vinci Code
Publisher: Doubleday
Authors: Dan Brown
Rating: 5/5
The Da Vinci Code
If you Take You Religion Seriously...


Prepare to find many revelations and statements in "The Da Vinci Code' to be scandalous or just downright heretic. But remember...ITS FICTION! Though based on some fact, the book is a work of fiction, making presumptions based on the facts author Dan Brown researched. But reading these presumptions and analyzing them is in the books' fun, as well as being a ming-boggling, multi-layered suspense thriller, ripe with conspiracy, chases, high-technology and well-drawn characters. Robert Langdon is a American symbologist in Paris on business when he is wrongly fingered for the late night murder of the curator of the Louve, and goes on the run with a french cyptographer Sophie Neveu, the grandaughter of the curater. What follows are downright brilliant puzzles and conundrums expertly designed by Dan Brown involving not only clues clverly hiden in Da Vinci's paintings but also hidden ancient symbolism in many modern religious marks and even secular culture. It all points to a startling revelation about what the Holy Grail actually is, a far cry from the wooden chalice of lore.Brown writes the book at a breakneck pace, with barely a single chapter over a couple of pages, enhacing the effect. Not to mention the father you get into "The Da Vinci Code," the more you absolutely have to read. Even if you don't buy into the books' laments on modern religion, "The Da Vinci Code" is utterly compulsive reading.



Product: Book Paperback
Title: Fact and Fiction in The Da Vinci Code
Publisher: Bridegroom Press
Authors: Steve Kellmeyer
Rating: 5/5
Fact and Fiction in The Da Vinci Code
Amazed at the vitriol of these reviews


This book -- actually, it's more like a pamphlet at 96 pages -- is little more than an exercise in Catholic polemics disguised as a serious commentary on Dan Brown's best-selling novel, The Da Vinci Code. If that sort of thing appeals to you, then you'll love this book; otherwise, save your money. Despite its disingenuous title, Kellmeyer's pamphlet spends very little time discussing historical evidence, at least as I understand the concept. Instead, Kellmeyer spends most of his 96 pages attacking the novel as inconsistent with Catholic doctrine. It had never occurred to me that The Da Vinci Code was consistent with Catholic doctrine; so, this is neither here nor there for me. Kellmeyer makes it very clear that he views The Da Vinci Code -- which he compares to the Protocols of the Elders of Zion, no less -- as nothing less than an attack on the Catholic faith; and his pamphlet is an obvious apologia offered in response to that attack. Kellmeyer's basic thesis is that The Da Vinci Code should be viewed as an historical novel set in an "alternate universe", in which the Catholic faith is founded "on a lie". The lie, of course, is the divinity, death, and resurrection of Jesus Christ. Of course, mainstream Christianity in general would be founded on a lie in such an "alternate universe" -- not just the Catholic faith -- but, Kellmeyer is so focused on defending Catholicism from the perceived challenge offered by The Da Vinci Code that he never seems to recognize this fact. Kellmeyer also never clearly articulates the reasoning underlying his thesis that The Da Vinci Code is set in an "alternate universe"; but, he strongly suggests that this conclusion follows naturally from the self-evident fact that Catholic doctrine (again, specifically Catholic doctrine, not Christianity broadly speaking) is ultimate Truth. In other words, we all know that the Catholic faith is Truth, so any novel that suggests otherwise must take place in an alternate universe. This sort of vague, clumsy, and ultimately circular reasoning is characteristic of much of Kellmeyer's tract, which appears to have been hurriedly written, and shows it. For those who don't know -- and you won't find out from Kellmeyer -- the foundational premises of The Da Vinci Code's plot did not originate with Dan Brown or his novel. The Da Vinci Code's plot premises appear to have been drawn directly from the pages of an earlier (1982-83) non-fiction book entitled Holy Blood, Holy Grail by Michael Baigent, Richard Leigh, and Henry Lincoln. I'm certainly not endorsing this book one way or the other, but it seems to me that any investigation of the historical evidence -- or lack thereof -- for the ideas presented in The Da Vinci Code should probably begin with this book. For my part, I am both intrigued by and skeptical of the ideas found in both Holy Blood, Holy Grail and The Da Vinci Code. I am intrigued because the Holy Grail is an historical riddle; I am skeptical because the evidence for this particular solution to the riddle seems rather thin to me. Personally, I find the ideas presented in these books to be neither shocking nor implausible (nor do I think that they must necessarily be viewed as an attack on Catholicism or Christianity); but, I also don't think that they have met the burden of proof as yet. I was hoping that Kellmeyer's pamphlet might shed some light on the matter. It appears that I was wrong.



Product: Book Hardcover
Title: The Da Vinci Code
Publisher: Doubleday
Authors: Dan Brown
Rating: 2/5
The Da Vinci Code
Slow and Cumbersome


I had eagerly awaited the chance to read this book because of all the rave reviews I had heard about it. Unfortunately, the reality did not live up to the hype. While expecting a mystery thriller, what I got was mostly historical fiction.While the author seems to have done a lot of research into the history of the grail and secret societies, the mystery was poorly plotted and seemed to drag where it should be speeding along. Hot thriller? I'd say lukewarm at best. The first 150 pages were hard to get through, but I persevered. The story did pick up a little bit after that, but was so trite and predictable that I had it all figured out by page 200.What seems to fascinate everyone that reads the book is the "history" given- and some people actually seem to believe the premise given in the book to be real. (See other reviews.) However, this is a work of FICTION. There is just enough truth mixed in with the fiction to perhaps fool the masses, but any true Bible scholar knows better.



Product: Book Hardcover
Title: The Da Vinci Code
Publisher: Doubleday
Authors: Dan Brown
Rating: 5/5
The Da Vinci Code
Very Enjoyable


Great research: way out. For a very similar book, check out "MEET MARK TWAIN."



Product: Book Hardcover
Title: The Da Vinci Code
Publisher: Doubleday
Authors: Dan Brown
Rating: 1/5
The Da Vinci Code
Anti-Christian Agenda Driven


Well, I just couldn't go on with this book. I figured the author had some anti-Christian leanings when he mentioned how the church killed some five million 'witches' way back when - which is, I'm pretty sure, way off. But, the book already had my interest, so I just thought I would enjoy the rest of it for entertainment's sake.But when, just over half way through the book, I was expected to swallow that the divinity of Christ was never part of the early church's beliefs, but was invented by Constantine, four centuries after Christ, for purely political reasons, I felt sick. Oh, yes, he had the Councel of Nicea convene, canonize the Bible according to his wishes (leaving out all those other books - 58 other gospels, no less - that proved Jesus was just a man). Oh, they also decided to make Jesus God at this convention. Constantine needed this, you see, for population manipulation purposes, of course - and this forms the foundation of Christianity today. "You mean the divinity of Christ was decided on by a vote?" -"Yes, and a very close vote at that", the scholarly characters of the book ensure us. The dizzied woman gives the trusted scholar a look of shocked wonder. He replies with a gental nod on confirmation. It's Puke-O-Rama time, everybody!Okay, at this point I can see the author is basically making an attempt to debunk and discredit Christianity - the whole point of the book. I felt violated. He could have at least have shown some respect for historical facts. You think he would have figured that some people, believers and non-believers alike, have actually looked these things up.



Product: Book Hardcover
Title: The Da Vinci Code
Publisher: Doubleday
Authors: Dan Brown
Rating: 4/5
The Da Vinci Code
An escapist's dream


THE DA VINCI CODE has been on the top of the best-seller list for so long that I finally decided to read it and see why. The story of the book is common knowledge by this time so that much of the mystery author Dan Brown traces so well is now a bit passe. But THE DA VINCI CODE brings to light a few important lessons that inform about the reading public: first, there is obviously a large audience for 'who-dunnit' mysteries, second, there must be at least a little interest in matters ecclesiastic for a novel based on the Catholic Church/Knights Templar/Holy Grail/Opus Dei etc, and third (thankfully) there is evidence that the public is willing to dig in to a bit of art history and controversy that is in fact much more interesting that the information in the media today. As far as a book is concerned, Dan Brown begins his "Novel" with a FACT sheet: "All descriptions of artwork, architecture, documents, and secret rituals [Opus Dei, Priory of Sion, Vatican, etc]in this novel are accurate". That alone makes this book in evidence of a lot of research. The action takes place in approximately 24 hours but the pace of the tale from France to England and back is breathless. While the delivery of the story is at the speed of breaking the sound barrier, with the accompanying 'can't-put-it-down' reading situation, Brown doesn't really write with elegant prose, or make his caper characters much more than chessboard pawns as far as fleshing them out into people about whom we care. This is not a book for those who love to languish in the beauty of the English language: there are no truly memorable passages that beg to be re-read because of their beauty of expression. But given that, this is an obvious crowd pleaser and seems a sure bet for a movie - if Mel Gibson's PASSION doesn't steal all its thunder.Writers write for different reasons; readers seek books for different needs. THE DA VINCI CODE is a fine escapist route to take on a plane trip or to devour when the world is too much with us. Great literature it is not - and that really is OK!



Product: Book Hardcover
Title: The Da Vinci Code
Publisher: Doubleday
Authors: Dan Brown
Rating: 3/5
The Da Vinci Code
Naughty Pleasures


I can describe reading this work as similar to eating a box of Krispy Kreme doughnuts for supper. There are a number of well-documented reasons why this deviation from a healthy diet is not good for you, but those creme-filled chocolate frosted beauties are just so, so delicious. The same is true of DVC. Despite its factual errors and polemic slant, it is a deliciously intriguing read. I suppose there are many worse ways to be naughty.



I would venture to guess that the plot line of this work is generally known: a secret society of European men of science and letters keeping alive an alternative account of the final destiny of Jesus Christ. This secret, so remarkable, has the power to turn traditional Christianity on its head. The villains of the piece are the Roman Catholic Church, whose whole existence in this work has been dedicated to suppressing the secret, and specifically Opus Dei-or a fringe element of the group, at least-which will resort to all sorts of murder and mayhem to obtain the final, conclusive key to the puzzle. Despite the theme of nearly timeless entities, the book moves along with the pace of a "24" episode and covers roughly a twenty-four hour span of time.



What spoil an otherwise excellent read are two factors: the first is the targeting of the Catholic Church and Opus Dei. Every work needs heroes and villains, but I found the Catholic bashing excessive. Brown plays on two current Catholic controversies-a male, clerically based structure of governance and scholarship, and its corollary, the second place status of women, real or imagined, to gain the reader's approbation that yes, Catholicism is quite capable of a fraud the likes of which Brown describes.



Secondly, Brown's research is eclectic, selective, and often just wrong. A veritable cottage industry of corrective works has recently appeared on bookshelves in recent months. A reasonably knowledgeable reader will easily spot the more egregious errors; a theologian, historian, or art critic will have a field day. The particular difficulty here is that Brown's puzzle is so delicately intertwined that if even one or two strands are defective, the entire weave becomes highly suspect.



To someone yet to read this work, I would simply say that you are facing the doughnuts for supper dilemma. You'll probably love it, so long as you don't mind the heartburn in the morning.




Product: Book Paperback
Title: Cracking Da Vinci's Code: You've Read the Fiction, Now Read the Facts
Publisher: Cook Communications
Authors: James Garlow
Rating: 5/5
Cracking Da Vinci's Code: You've Read the Fiction, Now Read the Facts
Excellent- Just what I was looking for!


Finally, a straight foward book that isn't afraid to tear apart Dan Brown's sickening Da Vinci Code. Authors James L. Garlow and Peter Jones did an outstanding job in setting the facts straight, and putting all of Brown's nonsense to rest. For anyone who has (or even hasn't) read the Da Vinci Code, this book will clear your head of all the lies and fictional claims that Brown's immoral work of trash has produced.



Product: Book Hardcover
Title: The Da Vinci Code
Publisher: Doubleday
Authors: Dan Brown
Rating: 1/5
The Da Vinci Code
I tried! I really tried!!


I had heard so much about this book and about how fantastic it was. I tried, I really tried to like the Da Vinci Code, but I could not finish it. It has a great story line, and Mr. Brown could have created great twists and turns with it--but he ran out of gas. His style included a big twist (like a murder) in the story--then for twenty pages, the characters would talk about it. Another big twist; and another twenty pages of discussion. That, and the fact he took true facts, tweaked them considerably, and then presented them to the reader as fact. I would have even liked if the book if it had been well written, but it was not. Run on sentences, changes of person and numerous other discretions of writing made for a very choppy read. I really tried to like this book, but could not.



Product: Book Hardcover
Title: The Da Vinci Code
Publisher: Doubleday
Authors: Dan Brown
Rating: 3/5
The Da Vinci Code
Facile and Pat


I thought this was a good book, an attention-keeper, and something that makes you want to learn more about what's going on in the conspiracies of the world. I probably learned more about mathematical sequences, ancient cults and modern-day tensions in the Church than I expected. Then again, I didn't expect any of that when I started the book. The only thing that I have against it, is that the death of the Louvre's director is the thread that keeps it going throughout the book. Whenever a little "pick me up" is needed, we find it in one of the clues left behind by this man. That in itself is not bad -- but then I realized how much this individual was able to accomplish in the twenty or thirty minutes that he had to live after he had been shot. In a way, it's almost like something from a Saturday-morning cartoon -- here's a guy who's been shot in the stomach, experiencing an agonizing death, and still has presence of mind to leave a large amount of clues behind for others to find. Truly amazing.Great read, makes you want to dust off those old math books and look for pictures of honey bees and sunflowers. Now I know whey they were in those books.



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